Camp Cotton, Texas 7/8/1916

Dear Em,

           

I am doing very good in the writing line aint I? But as long as I feel like it and have the time I cant help keeping in touch with you and the folks as much as possible. I received a paper by mail yesterday and I supose it was you who sent it. If so I thank you and so do the rest of the boys. We are doing guard duty for twenty four hours, and then we go on outpost for twenty four more. Although the papers say every thing is fixed up between the two governments, we have heard firing all morning over in Mexico. It seems as though some of Villa’s men are closing in on Carranza’s outpost and the firing we hear are the “Mexican battles” we used to hear so much about. Our duty for the next twenty four hours will be to patrol the line which is only about one hundred yards from our last tent and warn against any attack that the Mexican would be foolish enough to attempt. They are giving us enough to eat and plenty of rest so we are not kicking any in that line, but when we get the hikes, and sham battles, which is bound to come before long, then, life will not be so sweet.

           

Now I know you like to hear from me as often as possible, so you can imagine how I must feel when I get a word from you. There is a fine breeze blowing today which makes it very comfortable. I wish you could hear the singing that goes on hear nights.

           

The regiment composed a song on the train which runs,

            We’ll hit the trail for Villa

                        We’re Yankees through and through

            We’ll show the sons of Mexico,

                        What the U.S.A. can do.

            We come from Massachusetts,

                        Victory or die,

            So give a grand old cheer boys

                        As the Eight goes marching by. Ra. Ra. Ra.

 

This is sung to the tune of “We’ll hit the line for Harvard.” Then the two Somerville companies follow it up with,

            Soma, Soma, Somervilla

                        Panka, Panka, Panko Villa

            Spanka, Spanka, Spanka Villa

                        We’ll beat him black and blue. Ra. Ra. Ra.

 

The whole battalion made a hit all the way down here with this song and I guess it is going to stick through out the regiment.

           

ChowLineInclosed you will find a card of a part of the company lined up for mess. If you notice you will find how clean I washed my socks, for I haven’t got my leggings on in this picture. You can also see Corporal Marks who is giving a good account of himself.

           

They say it is very hot up there. Well it is hoter down here but I bet we don’t feel it as bad as you do. It was 119 in the shade the Fourth. I don’t know where they got the shade unless they went down to El Paso for it.

           

We had a rain storm again yesterday and although it made the ground a mass of thick clay (of which you carry a ton of it on your shoes,) we were all satisfied, yes thankful.

           

I am feeling as good, if not better than any time in my life. Pa will probably remember that the last thing I said in regard to my going was the condition of my health. There are three men in the company that are in a bad way. But I guess they will come around all right.

           

Well give my regards and best wishes to all you come in contacked with, and don’t forget Maggie, and Napoleon. But above all don’t forget to write and I will still remain the same

           

Sam

 

P.S. We had some more pictures taken of the noncomps, so expect to hear from me again very soon.

 

© Copyright 2008 by Richard Landers, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Published in: on May 30, 2008 at 11:46 pm  Leave a Comment  
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