Somewhere in France, 6/21/1918

Somewhere in France

June 21st 1918

Dear sister Madaline:

Again another day gone by and no mail as yet.  If only the government would see that our mail was delivered to us I think the boys would feel very much better although I know the boys of our battalion are all merry and happy.  The eats are great but their is a shortage of bread.  For lunch each day we get good old irish stew with plenty of potatoes, meat and carrots.  It is rumored that we boys get paid either tonight or tomorrow but you know what the army is for rumors.  According to the New York Herald Paris Edition the Allies are winning on all fronts.  I’ve seen quite some German prisoners since we moved to our new town.  They are a good and well fed lot of men but poor fighters.  As you know an American soldier has the gumption and blood to fight hand to hand but Jerry or Fritz will run away as soon as an American shows his steel.  The german army that is riflemen are not very good but credit must be given to their artillery.  Guess I will close for now as first call for retreat or call for inspections has just sounded, I am.

Your Brother

Joe

Corp Joe Maus

105 U.S. Inf Co A

American E.F.

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Somewhere in France, 6/19/1918

Somewhere in France

June 19th 1918

Dear sister Madaline:

I really do not think this letter will be very long as I’ve written you all the news of interest in my last few letters.  Up to now we boys have not received any mail the reason I suppose is on account of the shortage of freight trains for delivery of our mail from town to town.  I know that you have written at least once a week thierfore I think I am entitled to one letter in one month for that is how long we boys are on foreign soil.  I am taking up an interesting subject which keeps me busy for a few hours during the day and a few hours at night.  Morning I go to school and for one half hour in the afternoon I get detailed to lecture on this subject which is hand grenade.  The subject although it is hard is interesting.  The weather yesterday and today has been very poor as it has done nothing but rain then stop and rain again.  Theirs no sense of us praying for rain as we drill and work rain or shine.  As yet I haven’t had the chance to write any of my friends but expect to do so soon.  Guess I will close now will write again tomorrow.

I am

Your Loving Brother

Joe

Corporal Joe Maus

105 U.S. Inf. Co A

American E.F.

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

From John, Jamaica N.Y. 6/16/1918

John J. O'Farrell, Joe's Brother-in-law

Jeffry Ave, Jamaica, N.Y.

June 16, 1918

Dear brother Joe:

I suppose it will be some time before we get any mail from you but I know that you will be glad to hear from home, for when one is a distance from old New York they always like to know whether the old town is still on the map.  I don’t know whether you have heard of Fritz’s latest scheme, but he is now operating a few submarines off our coast, but like the brave man he is, he is attacking a few small unarmed craft and is taking damn good care to keep away from anything that looks like a war vessel or a transport in convoy.  Generally speaking he has made a fairly good mess of things.  My boss, Paymaster Karker, left for duty overseas the other day and before he left he fixed things so that I can follow him later if everything else is O.K.  I hope to be able to arrange matters, for I am really fond of him, as he is one of the most efficient officers in the Navy.  My old team, the Yankees are going pretty good so far this season and I am pulling for them to win the pennant.  Home Run Baker is pounding the cover off the ball and the rest of the team is following his example; the fans have nicknamed them “Murders Row” for the way the can slam that old ball.

Bill Zimmer, who formerly was quite a ball player here in town, I think you know him, was home from Camp Devens last Sunday.  He shapes up pretty good as a soldier and says he likes the life and that he has gained 20 lbs. in weight.  Doctor Hyland was around town in uniform yesterday.  He has just been made a first lieutenant in the Medical Corps and leaves in a few days for some camp.  Lieut. Fletcher, who lived down in Bergens house has also gone Over There.

I hope, Joe, that you are in good health and spirit, and that you are learning fast, so that when the proper time comes you will be able to fill any position of responsibility assigned you, for you are aware surely of our keen interest in your future.

I will close for now, dear brother, with the sincere wish that no matter what may happen you will always show the stuff you are made of and make us all feel proud of you.

With love and best wishes for all, and may God bless and protect you.  I remain, as ever.

Affectionately,

John

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Somewhere in France, 6/16/1918

Somewhere in France

June 16th 1918

Co A. U.S. Inf.105th

Dear sister Madaline:

Just after finishing a good old army dinner of boiled beef, army beans, coffee and good old french bread and butter.  A few of the boys including myself went to church this morning and received the sacraments.  Their are quite a few french orphans around this town and one in particular has been around our billets from early morning until late at nights.  I have always loved children especially Bob and Madaline and since I’ve been away I always try to be around the youngsters.  This youngster went to church this morning with me and shared in my mess for lunch.  He can speak very little English and that little I have taught him.  He can say mess and Joe and count up to ten.  I am going to try to teach him our army song “Hail Hail the gangs all here”.  I am going to look up Pete Bagnasco this afternoon as I do not think he is very far away from our billets.  The past two weeks we have been feeding on english raisins but are now feeding on our true american raisins which mean more to us.  The English soldier can feed on cheese jam bread and tea but we american boys have to have our meat, coffee, butter and bread.  The english soldier does not get as much pay as we boys do so you see we American boys have no kick coming.

Up to now I can assure you dear sister that my health and condition has been great.  Many nights my thoughts go back home and think what sorrow is being shed for the boys who left their happy homes.  Of course dear sister we boys are sacrificing our homes some good times and some boys their lives but from what I know have heard the Boche is afraid of he Yankee and will not give sammy a bayonet fight.  Our slang word for German is Jerry and from reports Jerry is down very low on his feet.  Must close now dear sister with love to you all, I am.

Your Brother

Joe

Co A 105 Inf

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

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