Somewhere near Doullens, 9/8/1918

Somewhere in France

Dearest sister Madaline

I haven’t written you in such a terrible long time it looks as if I have forgotten you but it isn’t so the reason was on account of being in the line.  I spent fourteen long days in the line and therefore you see my letter is going to be long and interesting.  Well dear sister after you read what I have to say you will notice that it was not only my praying but also yours and the gift of god.  God surely was with me and I can honestly say that I am the luckiest man on two feet to be where I am today.  Of course dear sister a man when writing gets an opportunity to exaggerate things but everything I am writing is so true that it would be impossible to exaggerate a single thing.

Well we started for the support line on a bright moonlight night in which we stayed for a short time.  We then advanced to the front line for a few nights.  Heres where my first experience on patrolling comes in.  After spending one night in the front line I was told to report to company Hdqs.  After doing so I was ordered to go out on patrol in “No Mans Land” to go out and get a prisoner.  Of course dear sister you understand the predicament I was in to go out never before being out their and capturing a prisoner for information.  I reported that same night and our platoon Lieutenant and myself went out as far as Jerries Bob Wire which was about 120 yards away from our trench and eighty yards from Jerries.  We ran into a few Jerry patrols but did not battle them as they out numbered us.  I will say dear sister that I held myself fairly well but my throat was a bit dry this showed a bit of nervousness but we returned back to our lines safe.  The night we hit the front line it started raining until we came out yesterday.

After resting the next day I was ordered to go out on patrol again that night but my objective was different.  I forgot to say on my first patrol I did not get my objective but on my second I did.  My second objective was to get the exact location of Jerries trenches.  After crawling for about 180 yds 20 yds away from Jerries line I drew a small map of Jerries trenches for about 100 yds.  Now dear sister after doing a bit in the front line our division went over the top advancing and capturing a big hill.  That day they advanced 300 yds.  While out on my second patrol my feeling was this way well I don’t give a rap I’m just as safe here as if I were home although I wasn’t but returned back safe.

Well the next day we went over the top this being my first time over and we advanced 800 yards capturing many prisoners.  After holding our new position Jerry counter attacked and me having charge of a machine gun my men got two Jerries and you ought to see the dammed beasts hit the dust.  Their counter attack was unsuccessful.  After getting relieved we moved to the support and Jerry sent over a barrage and heres where your prayers and every one homes who is praying for my safety was answered.  We were in our trench and for one hour and fifteen minutes shells as high as nine inch fell near and around us and for that length of time I held the rosary in my hands and said prayers constantly for that length of time. Now dear sister after going throw all this I can vouch if I get back home safe I’m going to live thats is home first and my church shall be my second home.

Well dear sister I haven’t rested as yet since I came out of the trenches and being that  its getting kinder late I guess I will stop and continue in the morning.  Now about cooties every man is pretty well cootied up and my body is covered with nothing but cootie bites but as soon as I get a good wash and a new set of clothes Mr cootie will then vanish.

Our troops are doing wonders and from what I know this war will be over soon as Jerry is on the run.  The whole allied troops have and are still advancing on the entire front and Jerry surely be back at his own front very shortly.  It is rumored that we get paid today.  Did pa receive my money order yet?   Is pa receiving his monthly allotment regularly.

I guess I will close now with love and kisses for you all.

I am

Your Brother

Joe

I received your cable gram.  Thanks very much.  Joe

Corporal Joseph MAus

105 U. S Inf. Co. A

American E. F.

A.P.O. 748

[Note: This letter contains reminiscence of experiences during the Ypres-Lys Offensive]

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Somewhere in France, 8/18/1918

Somewhere in France

August 18, 1918

Dearest sister:

Nothing special to write about except that my health and condition is best ever.  For the past three weeks the weather has been grand the kind of weather we soldier boys care for.  You understand why we boys hate bad weather not only that its disagreeable but also because it kinder hinders us in our work.  Our training is getting more interesting each day not only in a military way of speaking but also in a way that we enjoy it.  Once theirs enjoyment in work one may take more interest in his work and that’s the kinder of work we are doing now.  Of course the work is hard but not strenuous.  Did I tell you that Jenison was in the hospital not injured but ill.

You asked me in your letter to tell you more about myself this I do dear sister and the censor passes everything except articles pertaining to military movements and its works.  Now you can tell or write me anything you please as incoming mail from dear old U.S. is not censored.  I told you in my last letter that we received our pay for June and being that I have a little to much money I thought I would send home to pa 183 francs or thirty two dollars in money order form which you will find under this cover.  This alone will show you that I have since in the army learnt the value of a dollar for the prices over hear are terrible.  I am sure pa can put this money into better use that I can for the only thing I need money for is cigarettes cigars and tobacco, writing paper and envelopes candy and one in a while a glass of beer.  I have a large supply of tobacco but find sweet candies and writing material very scarce.

Guess I will close now only hoping you are all enjoying the best of health and that you receive the money OK.

I am

Your Brother

Joe

Corp. Joseph Maus

105 U.S. Inf. Co. A.

American E. F.

A.P.O. 748

Mailed August 29th on account of being in a position where I could not mail it.

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Somewhere in France, 8/16/1918

Somewhere in France

August. 16th 1918

Dearest sister Madaline:

Just a few moments before drill call so I thought I would write you now instead of tonight.  We received our pay yesterday for June for which I received 107 francs.  Uncle Sam still owes us for the month of July but why worry about July’s pay when we are financially fixed.  This is our second payment so far since we arrived in france so you see pay is very slow in reaching us although its always sure to appear.  Of course 107 francs sounds as big as one hundred dollars but between the French people and their enormous prices I don’t think it lasts very long.  I bought a Waltham worked watch (wrist) for twenty francs for which we would have to pay $16 back home although it only cost my about five dollars.  We are at our rest camp and am living the life of really.  Guess I will close with plenty of love and kisses to you all, I am.

Your Brother.

Joe

Corp. J. Maus

105 US Inf. Co A

American E.F.

A.P.O. 748

PS:  Did you or Anna receive my photos yet?

Joe

After reading the star I noticed that Principal Sweeney of Public School 6 wishes to have all boys names who are doing service over hear.  Would you ask John to do that for me immediately.

Joe

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Somewhere in France, 8/15/1918

Dearest sister:

Today being a day of rest and nothing to do except rest around and write letters.  I am going to town this evening and expect to go to a show that is put up by some of our men in our division.  Did you receive the money order of $32 which I sent [unreadable].  Of course [unreadable] the money at this end providing you do not receive it.  I still have 100 francs to last me until pay day and I shan’t worry about being broke nor do I want you Anna or pa to think that I am so far away without money.  A soldier doesn’t need very much money over hear as their isn’t anything to get for it.  Although if a fellow should get a leave that’s the time money is needed.

It doesn’t happen that I am looking for a leave as I’m not on foreign Soil.  [unreadable] I done my [unreadable] I mean I haven’t neglected playing this game but my object is to get at least five or more dirty Huns before going away on a leave.  Although this might sound a trifle noisy but I mean it and my heart and soul is in back of everything I say.

We are going to get a Mexican Border service bar and medal and when I get back home with my service bars pinned across my breast something I will feel [unreadable] the air of new [unreadable]  received any decorations the reason is that the opportunity hasn’t arisen but they surely are scarce.  Our decorations aren’t anything like the french decoration (Creoux de La Goure) for almost every man in the French army has one pinned on his breast and it surely looks as if they were served at mess times.  Well guess I will close now dear sister with love to you all, I am.

Brother Joe

Corp J. Maus

Co A 105 US. Inf.

American E.F.

A.P.O. 748

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Somewhere in France, 8/14/1918

Somewhere in France

August 14, 1918

Dear sister Madaline:

We received our weekly issue of mail and as usual I received my share.  I received three letters from you three from Anna two from Priscilla and a few friends of mine.  Their are quite a few of my friends writing me sometimes three times a week but the Wulferst have forgotten me and of course I am doing the same.  I am not going to waste my good time writing to people who do not appreciate it.  In fact I am so busy either drilling or writing my folks and friends that I really cannot be interrupted by writing people that never write me.  Although both Wulferst and I are still the greatest friends.  Did you receive my photo.  I wrote a letter to John yesterday. Guess I will close now will write again tomorrow, I am.

Your Brother

Joe

Corp. Jos Maus

105 U.S. Inf Co A.

American E.F.

A.P.O. 748

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Postcard from Somewhere in France, 8/13/1918

I am well.

I have received you letter dated July 17 + 22.

Letter follows at first opportunity.

I have received letter from you lately.

Joseph Maus

August 13th 1918

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Somewhere in France, 8/12/1918

Somewhere in France

August 12th, 1918

Dear Brother John:

I received your letter some time ago but am sorry to say that I could not of answered sooner.  Of course John you realize how hard it is at times for me to write all my folks, relatives, and friends, but somehow I have been fortunate and have been able to write both Madaline and Anna almost everyday.  Isn’t it wonderful the way the Yankee Boys are treating the Huns.  Well it’s the good old Yankee blood and spirit.  It is needless for me to try and tell you any war news and I know the N.Y. papers furnish you with more news than what we boys get here.  John, my ambitions are great and many. Now that I have the experience I think I can show what stuff I am made of.  We are at our rest camp now and in a few moments I can see where I am forced to go out and get rations for the evening although its only about fifteen minutes of work.

Guess I will close now John will write soon again with love and kisses to you all, I am.

Affectionately

Joe

Corporal Jos. Maus

105. U.S. Inf Co A

American E. F.

A.P.O. 748

PS:  Did you receive my photo and long letter in which I told you everything since I left the states.

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Somewhere in France, 8/12/1918

Somewhere in France

August 12th, 1918

Dear sister Madaline:

I haven’t written you in days on account of military movements.  I haven’t received mail in about one week the reason being I was suppose on account of the shortage of transportation.  I received my photo which I think is very poor but just the same I think it shows my condition, health and spirit.  I am still seeing France on a pair of hob nails that is to say I’ve seen france yes very much of france on a pair of feet.  Weve just finished having an inspection of our equippment and belongings.  The weather has been great in the past two weeks this of course is our greatest delight.  Did you receive my long letter in which I told you about my experiences from the time I left the states until the present day.

Guess I will close now only hoping to hear from you soon, I am.  Love and kisses to you all.

Your Brother

Joe

Corporal Jos. Maus

105 U.S. Inf. Co A.

American E.F.

A.P.O. 748

Censor’s Signature:  OK/ SBE

PS:  I received the stars which you sent me.  They dated from June 7th to 15th.   Joe

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

From John, Jamaica N.Y. 8/12/1918

John J. O'Farrell, Joe's brother-in-law

Jeffry Ave, Jamaica, N.Y.

12 August 1918

Dear Brother Joe:

I suppose when you get this letter you will have seen some action for according to the latest press reports the 27th Division is now at it.  We all hope and pray that nothing serious will ever occur to you, but in the moment of supreme peril think of the sacred duty you are over there to perform and I feel sure that you will measure up as a real American, the kind that Fritz is getting a taste of along the Somme.

The latest news from the front is the most encouraging we have had since the war began and I think that the superiority of American grit, daredevilness, and gameness is turning the tide; the spirit that is in the breast of an American exists no place else in the world – what our boys lack in military science is more than made up for by their grit, and the people you boys have left behind are as pleased and as proud of you as it is possible for mortal to be.

An old friend and playmate of mine, whom I had not seen for several years was killed recently on the Somme, Major James McKenna of the 165th.  His brother Bill is a captain + regimental adjutant of the same regiment, both old L.I.C boys.

Mr. Grill told me yesterday he had written you during the week but that he had not heard from you recently. I received a letter from John Wulforst a few days ago and just as I expected, he was kicking about his Army life; but you know what to expect of him, a little discipline will make a man of him.  The other brother, Al, tried to enlist in the Navy but was rejected on account of guess (?) – his good eyes.  Bill Zimmer and Ed Fisher are now “over there”, I hope that you run into them some time.

Our baseball team at the Depot defeated the Pelham Naval Team Saturday by a score of 5 to 4, some game.  Gus Sandberg played with Pelham and he is a corking good catcher.  You remember him I guess, he caught for Rochester in the International League for the past two years.  Madaline and I were pleased to hear of Lieutenant Wulfenden’s promotion and we want you to remember us to him and convey our best wishes.

If you need anything please call on me and I will endevour to get it for you.  I realize, perhaps better than anyone, what you are up against over there, but keep a stiff upper lip and think of your God and country and I feel confident that everything will right itself.  Don’t lose your nerve in a tight place for that is a most dangerous thing.

Write me when you can.  With love and kisses from Bob, Madaline, Pop & myself, I remain,

Affectionately.

John

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

Somewhere in Belgium, 8/9/1918

August 9th, 1918

Dear sister Madaline:

After resting all day yesterday I am now ready to do my day’s work.  The work isn’t half bad that is it isn’t hard nor do we have long hours.  The weather in the past few days are great and well is it appreciated by us boys.  In order that I might get my mail sooner we have been advised to add to our old address A.P.O. 748.  So here after if you will dear sister just add same to my old address.  Isn’t it great the way the Yankee boys are treating the Huns.  Well its the Yankee blood and spirit.  Guess I have said about all I know so I will close.  Will write again tomorrow.  Lots of love and kisses to you all.

I am

Your Brother

Joe

My address is:

Corporal Joseph Maus

Co. A. 105 U.S. Inf.

American E.F.

A.P.O. 748

© Copyright 2011 by Lanny & Patti Brown, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

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