From Em, Everett Mass. 8/4/1918

Dear Sam.

 

It is just a week since I last wrote to you and I realy intended to write before. It is over three weeks now since we heard from you but of course we understand how things are and how busy you must be. You are certainly doing great work and keep it up.

 

We have a new member added to the family which takes up a lot of my time. Bert brought home a little kitten and it looks so much like Toodles that we named it Toodles. We are going to take her picture and send it to you. We have Leonard over here with us for two weeks. He told Mrs. Dowden Lena and I all about the movies and he made us laugh until I thought we’d bust. Henry and Bert went to the ball game. (The navy teams are playing today). We are going down to the movies tomorrow night with Leonard. He said if he was a soldier he’d kill the Kiaser and get full of medals.

 

The Telephone School is closed until September so I’ll have to wait until it opens again before I can try for a job. We are trying to get a telephone in but I don’t know when they intend to come with it. Pa bought a telephone stand and a chair that he can use when he wants to read. Aunt Madge and Molly are coming out here next Wednesday to spend the day. They were coming out last week but Madge was sick and they called it off. Madge hears from Tom quite often now and he give a good account of himself.

 

Uncle Al was over Friday night and he brought the old Family Bible from Maine. Seeing that Pa was the only one who had a family he gave it to him. Pa reconized it right away and he was glad to get it. Its as big as a picture album and we have it on the parlor table. In looking over the family record it shows that Pa was born in ’52 making him 66 years old.

 

Bert and Henry got home from the ball game and we just got through our supper. We are now waiting for Pa. He don’t get home tonight until 8.30. Bert’s sister Alice and her friend are coming over and we are going to have a sing.

 

I hope this letter reaches you O.K. and that it finds you in the best of health. We are all feeling fine and this air out here is great. Lena is now at the piano and I am going to close wishing that you return home soon. Henry and Leonard sends their love and of cource you know is always the same.

 

With Love from all

Em.

 

[This letter was returned to sender while Sam was in hospitals]

 

© Copyright 2009 by Richard Landers, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

From Em, Charlestown Mass. 9/25/1916

Dear Sam.

 

Recieved your letter today and I’m glad to hear youre getting along so good. Your card Sat said not to write any more and I thought sure you were going to start for home. The papers had it that you were to start for home by today but since Sat there hasn’t been anything said. You can’t rely on the papers. I guess nobody will know till you are ordered to pack and march to the train (which will be soon I hope).

 

Mary had the tooth ache last night and she didn’t feel well all day. She went down to the Union though this afternoon. It is lonesome here now without her. Lena is playing the piano and pa is sitting in the rocking chair reading. It is a cool night and feels kind of chilly.

 

Tom Higgins started for New York this morning. The buyer and asst. buyer took him. I guess he has a good job and if he takes good care of himself he might rise to be a buyer himself some day. I got your paper and read about the parade you had. I guess I would like to see it alright. You say your dish towel is wore out well why not let the dishes or tins dry in the sun. I should think your clothes would be worn out by the way you wash them every day.

 

There is no news here at all. There is going to be a big suger refinery put up down the end of Belmont st. They are dreging out the river and cleaning up the wharfs down there. I don’t suppose they’ll start building right away though. Of course you know you and I will have to watch them put it up from the window so that they will do it right.

 

When I mail this letter I’m going to take down my hair and get in to my bath robe and maybe by that time pa will go to bed and then Oh you Rocking chair and magazine. I hope this is your last week down there. We are all well and pa couldn’t be any better. I know when Mary reads your letter she’ll be dissappointed cause your not started for home yet. She is very anxious to see you like all the rest of us. Hoping this finds you well I will close

 

With Love from all

 

Em.

 

 

© Copyright 2009 by Richard Landers, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

From Em, Charlestown Mass. 9/19/1916

Dear Sam.

 

I think I see you in the right of the picture, am I right? Mary was very much pleased with hers. You may not be getting fat now but when you get home you ought to. We’ll have to squeeze up close together because Mary takes a lot of room at the table.

 

The papers say you will start for home very soon but I guess you’ll receive this letter though. They can’t send you home any too soon can they? Henry was over Sun. and stayed all the afternoon and we went down to Madge’s in the evening. He is coming to Madge’s tomorrow night. He thinks quite a lot of Madge. He is working on a job down the National House now.

 

Madge was up here last night with John and Mary. You see she is getting along pretty good when she walked that distance. When Pa read your card about the grass beginning to grow and everything looking green he started to laugh. Well I laughed to because its quite chilly up here now.

 

I see in the papers that someone want the boys to go to their armories because they think that if they went to Framingham the ground would be too cold to sleep on. I hope you do go to the armory and then we could go to see you oftener and maybe you could get home for a couple of hours. We intend to see you as soon as you land anyway with Mary in the lead.

 

Lena has gone to bed and I’m beginning to feel cold so I’ll have to hurry up so I can join her. You know she likes to have me sing her to sleep. You know how I sing myself to sleep don’t you?

 

You did pretty good to stick it out on that march you had. Its too bad Kingsman is sick but I hope he comes out alright. Tell him I was asking for him. I hope this letter finds you packing and getting your things together to move. The Hollands are fine and the Studdly girls and Emma sends their best regards. Every one is O.K.

 

Hoping this finds you well and happy like meself I will close.

 

With Love from all

 

Em.

 

P.S. X X X X X X By request of M.

 

 

© Copyright 2009 by Richard Landers, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

From Lena, Charlestown Mass. 9/11/1916

Dear Sam –

 

This is the end of another great day, nice and cool and the sun real warm. Mary and I went to the Thompson Squ. Theatre in the afternoon and after the show I could hardly drag Mary out. She is an awful movie fan. I suppose you are all waiting anxiously for the 21st to see what it will bring but perhaps as you say you better not raise your hopes too high.

 

Madge and John was up all day yesterday. Madge is getting along fine now. John had his violin with him and we had quite a concert. We are planning for another trip down to Nantasket although it is most too cold to go down. Madge thinks the trip will do her good because she has been feeling fine since our other trip.

 

Im glad you are feeling well but sorry to hear that some of the fellows have stomack trouble. Bert has it again but it must be tough in the Army where they cant get broths or any diet for it. We all received your cards with the poem on it Mary included. Every thing here is quiet, just as you say the same old thing every day nothing new.

 

I think after I get my wash in tomorrow Ill hang out your coat and suit. The air will do them good. Im starting some of my house cleaning but havent got very far yet for Im taking my time as I think it pays better in the end. I dont do much but after supper Im so tired I could fall right into bed. It’s the same way every night. Last night Madge and I went down to Mollies and at 8 o’clock I thought sure it must be 10 I was so tired and sleepy. I suppose you dont feel any too rested yourself at night time.

 

I dont know what you are going to do for a place at the table when you get home. Mary has had yours ever since she moved over here. You can imagine how much to home she is. Since the day before she moved over the only meal she has had in her own house is her breakfasts and she has been up here for that more than once. When she goes home in the evening I get lonesome for her but as I said before Im tired and go to bed. Mack was telling pa last Sat. that he dont see her for three days at a time. I dont know what we would do here for life without her.

 

Well how are the Mexicans behaving on the border. There isn’t much in the papers this week but I suppose you have enough to do just the same. I suppose just as you get ready to come home Villa will show up again. Of course you got my letter before now telling you I received the check and as I said in the letter I dont want you to be without money so when you are getting low in your funds let me know but you know it takes six days for your letters to come up now, it used to take three days and four at the most.

 

Now I know this is a dry letter but there is nothing new to tell about. There isn’t a sound on the street only the cars and it so quiet in the house you could hear a pin drop. Quite lively here, isn’t it? Now I guess Ill close and go to bed and I don’t think Ill lay long before I get to sleep its just 9 o’clock. Pa turned in long ago I bet he’s snoring now.

 

Dont work too hard and remember we are all waiting for the 21st as Mary says it (twenty oneth).

Love from all

Lena

 

 

© Copyright 2009 by Richard Landers, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

From the Shop, Boston Mass. 9/6/1916

Dear Sam,

 

On my return this morning from a little over two weeks vacation up in New Hampshire I found your postal which is dated in El Paso on Aug. 21st, hence you will see why the answer is delayed so long.

 

I was very glad to get your card but have heard about you right along so knew you were getting along first rate. Also, let me congratulate you on your promotion. As I understand it you are in reality a fourth sergeant as the first duty sergeant is the second sergeant of the company. I may be wrong about this but what difference does that make as long as you are coming along all right.

 

Everything is about the same around the store except that at times we are not very busy. I don’t know of any new faces and the only one who has left since you went away is Benson. He left the latter part of July to work up in Manchester, N.H. About a week after he left we got a notice that he was married. They’re all hitching up except you and I and I guess we are doomed to be old maids.

 

I see Jimmy Mellor once in a while and he seems to be getting along. Our bath room sink stopped up while I was away and Jim came to fix it. After he got through he told my mother that it would not stop up again if Walter and I would stop washing our feet in the bowl.

 

While up in the country I put on a little weight and now when I get on the scales they say 139. That is not very heavy for a fellow of my height but you will appreciate that it is pretty good for me.

 

I understand by the papers that you ought to be home sometime after the first of October and I shall be very glad to see you. That will make four months in the open and I suppose you have gotten fat and browned up so we will find it hard work to know you. Living in the open must be doing you good and I am glad to learn that you are feeling so fine.

 

I was mighty glad to get your card and would like to hear from you again. I remain,

 

Sincerely your friend,

 

Fred.

 

P.S. How many greasers have you put away and how many rattle snakes have you killed for the skins. I see by the papers that some of the boys are making a few extra dollars selling the skins for belts etc. When you get back you won’t know how to appreciate a little hot weather. It will probably be so cool here.

 

© Copyright 2009 by Richard Landers, All Rights Reserved. No reproduction without permission.

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